UCHealth – Mountain Crest Behavioral Health Center

UCHealth – Mountain Crest Behavioral Health Center

ABOUT UCHEALTH – MOUNTAIN CREST BEHAVIORAL HEALTH CENTER

Located in Fort Collins, Colo., Mountain Crest Behavioral Health Center provides behavioral health services for adults and adolescents struggling with mental illness, substance abuse, and co-occurring disorders. Inpatient treatment, outpatient care, and medication management are available for both adults and teens ages 13 to 17, and intensive outpatient treatment (IOP) and medically managed detox are also available for adult clients.

Mountain Crest is a freestanding facility, but it is operated under Poudre Valley Hospital, a full-service hospital that serves the communities of northern Colorado, southern Wyoming, and western Nebraska.

TREATMENT & ASSESSMENT

Clients begin their recovery process with a thorough, confidential assessment, the findings of which inform an individualized treatment plan. All inquiries are confidential, and emergency assessments are available 24 hours a day.

Individuals dealing with severe chemical dependency or withdrawal symptoms typically begin their treatment with a period of medically-monitored detoxification. Once stabilized, they may transition to the center’s acute inpatient unit or IOP program, both of which use a combination of therapy and medical intervention. Family involvement is emphasized, and an on-site ropes course offers opportunities for experiential therapy and teambuilding exercises.

Program graduates may use Mountain Crest’s outpatient clinic and support groups for ongoing therapy, medication management, and support.

STAFF CREDENTIALS

Mountain Crest’s treatment team includes psychiatrists, nurses, and licensed clinical social workers.

ACCOMMODATIONS & AMENITIES

According to the center’s website, the natural landscape of Mountain Crest’s campus includes trees, lawns, and an on-site ropes course. The center’s housekeeping staff cleans the rooms on a daily basis, and the facility is equipped with TVs and Wi-Fi. Tobacco use is not permitted anywhere on the campus.

WHAT ALUMNI SAY

Cheyenne, the single alum polled by Best-rehabs.com at the time of this writing, noted that she would recommend the facility to others, but provided a mixed review. She gave the center’s cleanliness, the staff’s level of training, and the program’s group counseling above-average ratings, but submitted only one out of five stars for the facility’s leisure offerings, its holistic options, and its alternative therapies. “They didn’t offer any extra wellness services. For the money that I spent, it wasn’t worth it,” she wrote.

On Google, 14 reviewers – a mix of alumni and loved ones – provided an average rating of 2.5 out of five stars for Mountain Crest.[1] Those who were disappointed with their experiences complained about dismissive staff, billing issues, and unclean conditions. “They don’t care about their patients. They look down on you and treat you like garbage. I hated this place,” Izzy wrote in a representative review.

Adam, one of the handful of Google users to submit a five-star review, commended the “wonderful” staff and credited the facility with saving his life. T.R., who complained about the facility’s food and cleanliness, also appreciated the “awesome” staff. “You will learn some very important coping skills if you pay attention and ready to make a change in your life,” he wrote.

WHAT FRIENDS & FAMILY SAY

The three loved ones polled by Best-rehabs.com at the time of this writing shared mixed reviews of Mountain Crest. When asked how likely they were to recommend the facility to others, one respondent submitted a rating of five out of five stars, while the other two anonymous reviewers provided one- and two-star ratings. Jessie, the five-star reviewer, gave the program’s treatment effectiveness four stars and expressed appreciation for the center’s “many options for treatment options.” While the other two anonymous reviewers both felt that the center offered a safe environment, they were disappointed in the doctors’ “rushed,” “not attentive” care. “Rushed to medicate and move on rather than really diagnose Needs more initial diagnostic time with clinicians,” one anonymous reviewer wrote.

The two loved ones who submitted reviews to Yelp each provided one out of five stars and expressed disappointment with the center’s staff and treatment, the latter of which included errors in administering medication.[2] “(The doctor) made several medication errors that caused significant outcomes for my loved one,” Jessica wrote in her review.

FINANCING

Mountain Crest accepts Medicare, Medicaid, and most insurance plans, including Aetna, Cigna, and Humana. Financial assistance is available to qualifying individuals.

[1] https://goo.gl/HDj25a
[2] https://www.yelp.com/biz/mountain-crest-behavioral-health-care-system-greeley

Reviews about UCHealth – Mountain Crest Behavioral Health Center

  • Treatment Effectiveness
  • Accommodations & Amenities
  • Meals & Nutrition
  • Many options for treatment options. In patient and out patient.
  • Treatment Effectiveness
  • Accommodations & Amenities
  • Meals & Nutrition
  • Safe environment, well staffed Dr's gave rushed as demonstrated by follow up care. Rushed to medicate and move on rather than really diagnose Needs more initial diagnostic time with clinicians
    • Accommodations & Amenities
    • Meals & Nutrition
    Control over patients, safety was a strong point. Everything else was bad. Too narrow minded, too strict policies, not attentive, didn't listen, no amenities, awful service
    • Accommodations & Amenities
    • Meals & Nutrition
    The rules and regulations seemed quite appropriate, I participated in group therapy as well as a psychiatric evaluation and was started on meds successfully. They worked with me on using coping mechanisms and how to spot and avoid possible triggers. I felt like I didn't need to be there. My issues were much more minor than everyone else's. They didn't offer any extra wellness services. For the money that I spent, it wasn't worth it. If it is the closest facility and the situation is an emergency, then yes, I would recommend it. Hopefully I would never have to re-enter, but if I did need to have an inpatient stay, then I would want to go somewhere that offered more in terms of wellness support and activities. Also, I would want comfortable beds. Those were horrible. If it was a dire emergency and I was planning on committing suicide, then yes, I would go there as a last resort for immediate treatment. Since it has been a full 10 years since I was in the facility, I can't give any opinion on what it would be like to stay there now. I am sure that they have made advances in expanding treatment options, offering better tasting food, providing leisure activities other than coloring books and puzzles, and hopefully the mattresses are more comfortable.