Nebraska Urban Indian Health Coalition

Nebraska Urban Indian Health Coalition

ABOUT NEBRASKA URBAN INDIAN HEALTH COALITION

Located in Omaha, Neb., the Nebraska Urban Indian Health Coalition (NUIHC) provides residential treatment, outpatient treatment, and sober living services. In operation since 1986, this non-profit program specifically caters to American Indians and Alaska Natives living in the greater Omaha area. Medically monitored detox services are not available.

TREATMENT & ASSESSMENT

Residential treatment takes place at the Intertribal Treatment Center and lasts 60 to 90 days, and to participate, clients must be tribally enrolled. It consists of individual and group counseling, as well as educational workshops.

The outpatient program is also offered as an intensive outpatient program (IOP) that meets three times a week for at least 10 hours total each week. Clients participate in individual and group therapy.

The sober living facility is called Eagle Heights Transitional Housing Program. After an assessment, a plan is created to help transition clients from a residential treatment program to the real world. The focus is on learning daily living skills and practicing relapse prevention. Staff work with clients to access healthcare and to find a job and become financially secure.

The facility offers other programs for youth suicide prevention and drug education, as well as HIV testing and counseling.

STAFF CREDENTIALS

The treatment team consists of physicians, licensed drug and alcohol counselors, case managers, and professional counselors.

ACCOMMODATIONS & AMENITIES

The residential treatment program and sober living homes are smoke-free facilities. Clients are asked to bring a 60- to 90-day supply of any medication that they are taking. No additional information about the facility’s accommodations is listed on the website for the inpatient program.

The sober living facility has 10 beds. Clients have access to a shared kitchen, tablets, and cable. All utilities are paid by the facility.

WHAT ALUMNI SAY

At the time of this writing, Best-rehabs.com has not received any alumni feedback about NUIHC.

Elsewhere online, former clients gave mostly positive ratings. On NUIHC’s Facebook page, which the rehab has the ability to edit, four ratings averaged 4.8 out of five stars.[1] Alum Jeffrey wrote: “It’s a positive place for native American who need a little help.thanks for the journey.” Bobby added: “The counselors r great, the staff is like family to me and NUIHC is like home base!!!”

Additionally, on Google to date, there are two ratings for this facility, one positive and one negative.[2] While the reviewer who left five out of five stars supplied no commentary, the one who left just one star wrote: “Crappy place to go people are rude ,do not help you with your mental health issues , you can continue using while still passing there courses!”

WHAT FRIENDS & FAMILY SAY

One loved one submitted a review about NUIHC to Best-rehabs.com to date. Although the review was largely positive, with four out of five stars for exercise and leisure, holistic offerings, cleanliness, and staff experience, the loved one wasn’t impressed with the facility’s counseling options for mental health issues. The anonymous loved one wrote: “no mental health options. so many times there are mental health issues that need to be dealt with at the same time.”

FINANCING

According to the facility’s website, payment options include private health insurance, the Children’s Health Insurance Program, Medicaid, and Medicare. For those who need additional financial assistance to pay for treatment, discounted fees are available for those who meet certain criteria.

The sober living house costs $300 each month, and $100 of this fee goes into a savings account for the client.

[1] https://www.facebook.com/pg/nuihc/reviews/?ref=page_internal
[2] https://goo.gl/4w6DH3

Reviews about Nebraska Urban Indian Health Coalition

  • Treatment Effectiveness
  • Accommodations & Amenities
  • Meals & Nutrition
  • it was tree no mental health options. so many times there are mental health issues that need to be dealt with at the same time, sometimes it can help to accept that you have an illness and want help.