Vanderbilt Behavioral Health

Vanderbilt Behavioral Health

ABOUT VANDERBILT BEHAVIORAL HEALTH

The Behavioral Health Addictions Program at Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital in Nashville offers inpatient and partial hospitalization substance abuse treatment for adult men and women. Co-occurring mental health disorders are treated along with drug and alcohol addiction, and medically supervised detox services are available on-site. Additionally, the facility offers behavioral health treatment programs for children and adolescents.

TREATMENT & ASSESSMENT

Admission to treatment is available 24/7, and hospital staff members recommend the least restrictive level of care appropriate based on initial assessments. The partial hospitalization program meets seven days a week.

Vanderbilt’s Addictions Program is based on a 12-Step model and emphasizes education. Treatment plans are tailored to meet both the physical and emotional needs of each client. In addition to an introduction to the principles of Alcoholics Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous and access to 12-step meetings, treatment services include individual and group psychotherapy, family counseling, physical conditioning, and recreational activity designed to support sober social choices. Group sessions cover such topics as anger management, sex and health education, and spirituality, with an emphasis on incorporating the client’s own beliefs into their recovery process.

Comprehensive aftercare services are provided as well, and staff members work with clients to put together a thorough relapse prevention plan to follow upon release.

STAFF CREDENTIALS

The Vanderbilt Behavioral Health team is comprised of board-certified psychiatrists associated with the medical school, doctorate-level therapists, registered nurses, and licensed social workers, including one with a Master’s of Divinity.

ACCOMMODATIONS & AMENITIES

Website photographs present a clinical environment with simple furnishings. Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital is a smoke-free campus. While no further details are provided regarding the facility’s living arrangements and related offerings, a total of seven individuals polled by Best-rehabs.com contributed to average ratings of 4.3 out of five stars for meals and nutrition and 4.0 for cleanliness and upkeep. Metrics measuring policies regarding phone and internet use and exercise and leisure activity fared less favorably, with one reviewer noting a need for more exercise options.

WHAT ALUMNI SAY

Seven former clients submitted mixed reviews to Best-rehabs.com, granting an average rating of 3.7 stars for the effectiveness of treatment. One reviewer gave just one star, reporting that they received the wrong treatment. Two identified counseling as a program strength, while one wrote that not much counseling was available. The four individuals polled on the staff’s level of training and experience gave an average rating of four stars, but a rating of 3.3 stars reflected less satisfaction in opportunities for family participation.

Of the five alumni asked to rate the affordability of treatment or to indicate whether the cost was worth it, two responded positively and two negatively.

WHAT FRIENDS & FAMILY SAY

One family member responded to a Best-rehabs.com survey, rating most aspects of the facility evaluated three or four stars. They agreed with a majority of alumni that treatment was too expensive but also that it was highly effective and the staff was “great.” Accommodations and the availability of holistic treatment each received four-star ratings.

WHAT STAFF SAY

On the employment data website Indeed, 12 current or former staff members of Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital contributed to an average rating of 4.3 out of five. About one-third characterized the facility as having a fast-paced environment, and most noted that they enjoyed helping patients cope and working with other treatment staff.[1]

FINANCING

Vanderbilt Behavioral Health accepts coverage from many commercial health insurance providers and TennCare. The facility’s website also states that a sliding fee scale is applied for clients who have no health insurance and who have a documented financial need.

[1] https://www.indeed.com/cmp/Vanderbilt-Psychiatric-Hospital/reviews

Reviews about Vanderbilt Behavioral Health

  • Treatment Effectiveness
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  • Counseling was a strength of the facility but the other facilities were weaknesses. Just needs more versatile options for exercise.
  • Treatment Effectiveness
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  • great staff. good therapy. wayyyyy tooo pricey. if costs were more affordable, more folks could get help.
  • Treatment Effectiveness
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  • while your stay you meet with a panel of doctors to review how you are feeling and if the detox meds need to be adjusted. the maximum stay is 10 days and i would of loved to stay longer. this was a great facility. the staff is very caring and they detox you and also counsel you.they go over information so you know why you are an addict and also how to prevent relapse.it was a wonderful program.i just wish it was a longer stay
  • Treatment Effectiveness
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  • It worked for me, even though I wasn't a life long addict, just 4-5 years.
  • Treatment Effectiveness
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  • A great facility, but needs better holistic offerings.
  • Treatment Effectiveness
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  • It was affordable and clean, but is in need of better counseling options.
  • Treatment Effectiveness
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  • I recently admitted myself to Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital for depression, anxiety, and suicidal thinking. Upon my admission, I told the intake person that I had not slept in days and had knowingly taken 3 anti anxiety pills to help settle my mind. After I took them, I panicked, thinking I might have unintentionally overdosed. I have never had a drug problem and wasn't sure how many would harm me. Like, I said, I was mentally and physically exhausted. I was led to believe that Vanderbilt would help me with the problems I was experiencing and agreed to go inpatient for treatment.Upon my arrival to the floor, I quickly realized that something was amiss. The other patients on the floor did not seem to have issues like myself, they were rather combative and loud. I dismissed it because I am not one to judge others. However, when evening came and my room mate began screaming for water, her shoes, and the nurse, I knew something was off. I asked for my blood pressure medicine, and was told that it might interfere with my Detox. My what??? Red flags were flying everywhere at this point. I demanded to know what was happening, so my nurse told me that I was being treated for addiction to prescription meds and that I was on the detox floor. I was furious. I have battled depression and anxiety my entire life but not once have I even had a drug problem. I was insulted, embarrassed, and felt ashamed for even having to be in the hospital. I felt like this was all my fault. Sleep was not to had for me, and by 4:00 a.m., I had had enough. I demanded to call my husband, but that did not happen. Instead, the charge nurse was sent to talk to me. I told her of my plight, and she agreed that I did not meet detox requirements and said to hang in there until I saw the Doctor in a few hours. Around 8:00a.m., the Doctor did indeed see me, but unfortunately, he reinforced the addict theory and would not discharge me or move me to the appropriate floor. I was beyond furious. I decided to discharge myself against medical advice. I was told that my insurance would not pay for my stay, but I did not care. I was being treated unjustly and I wanted out! A few weeks later, I admitted myself to Parthenon Pavilion,was kept 7 days and treated for my depression and anxiety. Never once was drug addiction a consideration and I was given all of my medication as prescribed. Now, 4 months later, I have battled Vanderbilt over $648 that they have tried to force me to pay. The insurance did indeed pay their portion, unlike what Vanderbilt tried to make me believe. My opinion is, they should be happy with what they got and leave me the heck alone. But no, they have billed me and even turned down an appeal that I filed with the patient advocacy department. They say that I received "quality treatment" during my 18 hour stay. I wonder if they would consider that "quality treatment" for one of their family members. I just learned this week that I have been turned over to a collection agency for my portion of the bill. I am hurt, angry, embarrassed, and frustrated, but most of all, I am healthy once again and I have to remember that's what is important. No thanks to Vanderbilt. We are paying the balance, only because we are tired of dealing with this. However, if I can keep ONE person from going to this place, that is my objective. Please, please think long and hard before being admitted to Vanderbilt Psychiatric Hospital. I recommend Parthenon Pavilion at Centennial Medical Center if you need true, quality care for your mental health issues.
  • Treatment Effectiveness
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  • Not much counseling going on.